A Sad Hyperlink Story

I started at this article: UPenn Track Star Jumps to Her Death

Which led me to her Instagram.

Including a photo of her sister, tagged for her Instagram.

And the sister’s most recent photo is this:

Four clicks and we end up through the veil that dangles between reported news and quiet, personal moments. This little sister created a digital shrine without any expectation that thousands of people would seek it out. Internet grief.

thetruthaboutcatsanddogs:

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YO DAVID BYRNE PLEASE GET WITH IT I FEEL LIKE YOU’RE THE ONLY RESPECTABLE DUDE COMPLAINING ABOUT THE INTERNET AND MUSIC, EVERYONE ELSE IS LIKE METALLICA AND KENNY G (i actually don’t know Kenny’s opinion but i’m making a fair assumption here)

As a rule, I am allergic to the adjective “best,” which asserts only the inferiority of all other things—not a useful or appealing function, for those of us who are promiscuous thing-lovers.

In her altogether excellent meditation on Middlemarch, New York magazine’s Kathryn Schulz offers this characteristically brilliant one-liner on why “best” is the worst qualifier of all – a reminder particularly timely in the age of the linkbait listicle that tends to take the form of “The X Best Y.” (via explore-blog)

Nothing is best, nothing is worst, everything is always somewhere on the scale.